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Troy D. Chappell, collector
An Adventure with Early English Pottery

Ceramics in America 2001

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Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Three-handled cup, possibly Staffordshire, 1640–1660. Black lead-glazed earthenware. H. 3 1/2". (All objects from the Troy D. Chappell Collection; photos, Gavin Ashworth.) This multihandled cup is a remnant of medieval communal drinking vessels made by localized potteries throughout England. Fragments of similar cups have been found on early-seventeenth-century settlements in the Chesapeake region.

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Hand warmer, probably London, dated 1688. Delftware (tin-glazed earthenware). H. 4 7/8". Molded in the style of a book, this object was thought to hold hot water. Inscribed “when this yov see / remember mee / 1688.”

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Dish, probably London, ca. 1690. Delftware. D. 8 3/4". This press-molded dish is of a type made in England and on the Continent. No foot ring is present, often an English feature.

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Mug, attributed to David and John Philip Elers, probably Staffordshire, ca. 1695. Unglazed red stoneware. H. 3 5/8". The mug was slip cast and subsequently turned on a lathe. The branch and leaf sprigs were mold applied.

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Cup, probably Staffordshire, 1690–1700. Slipware, combed or feathered. H. 4". The potter added the unusual “S” pattern in the decoration.

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Dish or charger, probably London, 1702–1714. Delftware. D. 14". Inscribed “A R” for Anna Regina or Queen Anne. The back of this charger has a lead glaze over the tin glaze and a low pedestal foot.

  • Figure 7
    Figure 7

    Plate, London, 1740–1760. Delftware. D. 8 5/8". (Ex-collection: Dennis J. Cockell.)

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    Mug, Staffordshire, 1720–1730. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 3 1/8". Stoneware clay covered in a white slip and iron oxide applied to rim.

  • Figure 9
    Figure 9

    Sugar basin and cover, probably Bristol or Brislington, 1720–1730. Delftware. H. 6".

  • Figure 10
    Figure 10

    Figure of bird, Staffordshire, 1725–1730. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 5 1/8". Slip and incised decoration. (Ex-collection: Major Cyril Earle.)

  • Figure 11
    Figure 11

    Cream jug, Staffordshire, ca. 1740.
    Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 3 1/8". Mold-applied blue clay sprigs and tripod-footed base after a silver shape. (Ex-collections: Major Cyril Earle, Mrs. Catherine Collins.)

  • Figure 12
    Figure 12

    Mug, attributed to Samuel Bell, Staffordshire (Newcastle-under-Lyme), ca. 1740. Agateware. H. 4 1/2". Thrown on the wheel, this mug is composed of different-colored earthenware clays.

  • Figure 13
    Figure 13

    Dish, Bristol, ca. 1740. Delftware. D. 12 7/8". Decorated in a stamped circle technique. This large dish has a trimmed foot ring.

  • Figure 14
    Figure 14

    Plate, Bristol, 1740–1760. Delftware. D. 9".

  • Figure 15
    Figure 15

    Plate, London, 1745–1750. Delftware. D. 9". The card motifs are painted in the reserve area of a dense cobalt “powder” ground.

  • Figure 16
    Figure 16

    Jug, Staffordshire, 1750–1765. Slipware. H. 5 1/2". The checkerboard slip decoration is highlighted with cobalt blue.

  • Figure 17
    Figure 17

    Teapot, Staffordshire, 1750–1760. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 4 1/8". (Ex-collection: Mrs. Eugenia Cary Stoller.)

  • Figure 18
    Figure 18

    Bowl, Staffordshire, 1750–1760. Cream-colored earthenware. D. 4 1/2". Mold-applied sprig decoration and underglaze oxide colors. (Ex-collection: Sir Victor and Lady Gollancz.)

  • Figure 19
    Figure 19

    Sauceboat, Staffordshire, 1750–1760. Salt-glazed stoneware. L. 6 5/8". After a silver shape, this sauceboat was slip cast and highlighted with dabbed cobalt blue.

  • Figure 20
    Figure 20

    Teapot, Staffordshire, 1755–1760. Colored-body earthenware. H. 4 3/4"

  • Figure 21
    Figure 21

    Teapot, Staffordshire, 1755–1765. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 4 7/8". The polychrome decoration was enameled over the salt glaze and refired to set the colors.

  • Figure 22
    Figure 22

    Teapot, Staffordshire, 1755–1765. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 3 7/8". (Ex-collection: Mrs. Russell S. Carter.)

  • Figure 23
    Figure 23

    Chimney vase, probably Liverpool, ca. 1755. Delftware. H. 5 3/8". This type of decoration is generally referred to as the Fazackerly colors.

  • Figure 24
    Figure 24

    Wall tile, attributed to John Sadler printshop, Liverpool, 1756–1757. Delftware. W. 5". Woodblock print after Nilson of Augsburg.

  • Figure 25
    Figure 25

    Water bottle, probably Liverpool, ca. 1760. Delftware. H. 8 1/4". The painted scenes include both Western and chinoiserie images.

  • Figure 26
    Figure 26

    Teapot, probably Staffordshire, ca. 1760. Cream-colored earthenware. H. 4 3/4". A very unusual teapot with mold-applied brown clay and underglaze oxide colors.

  • Figure 27
    Figure 27

    Monkey figure, Staffordshire, ca. 1760. Cream-colored earthenware. H. 41/2". This press-molded figure is highlighted in underglaze oxide colors.

  • Figure 28
    Figure 28

    Plate, Staffordshire, ca. 1760. Cream-colored earthenware. D. 9 1/2". A very unusual press-molded plate with underglaze oxide colors.

  • Figure 29
    Figure 29

    Plate, Liverpool, ca. 1760–1765. Delftware. D. 8 5/8". (Ex-collection: Frederic H. Garner, Moorwood Collection.)

  • Figure 30
    Figure 30

    Plate, possibly Liverpool or Staffordshire, 1760–1765. Salt-glazed stoneware. D. 8 1/2". Three-color transfer print of Aesop’s The Fox and the Goat. (Ex-collection: Joseph E. Lowy.)

  • Figure 31
    Figure 31

    Teapot, Staffordshire, ca. 1765. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 3 3/4". The colors on this pot appear to have been added over the saltglaze and refired with a lead glaze.

  • Figure 32
    Figure 32

    Milk jug, Staffordshire, ca. 1765. Cream-colored earthenware. H. 3 1/2". This press-molded pineapple jug is highlighted with underglaze oxide colors. Similar fragments have been excavated in Williamsburg, Virginia.

  • Figure 33
    Figure 33

    Wall tile, attributed to John Sadler and/or Guy Green printshop, Liverpool, 1764–1775. Delftware. W. 5 1/8". Transfer printed after an engraving depicting a Turkish merchant. (Ex-collection: Louis L. Lipski.)

  • Figure 34
    Figure 34

    Teapot, attributed to William Greatbatch, Staffordshire (Fenton), 1770–1782. Creamware. H. 5 1/2". Gilding and enamel decoration of Cybele and Bacchus as satyrs.

  • Figure 35
    Figure 35

    Dish, probably Staffordshire, 1770–1775. Creamware. L. 9 3/8 ". Transfer-print decoration of Blindman’s Buff. The rim border elements are very unusual as each is nonrepeating. Smooth bottom.

  • Figure 36
    Figure 36

    Plate, London, dated 1776. Delftware. D. 9". Inscribed “stephen dell” on front and “1776” on back.

  • Figure 37
    Figure 37

    Cup, possibly Yorkshire (Swinton), dated 1777. Slipware. H. 3". Slip-trailed decoration includes the initials “I– S.”

  • Figure 38
    Figure 38

    Bowl, London, 1780–1790. Delftware. D. 5 7/8". A late example of English delftware. Similar neoclassical decoration was also used on creamware and pearlware

  • Figure 39
    Figure 39

    Basket and stand, probably Yorkshire, 1780–1790. Creamware. L. 6 3/8". Intended for confectionery or dessert. The detachable stand has a smooth bottom.

  • Figure 40
    Figure 40

    Troy D. Chappell.