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Sarah Neale Fayen
Playful Potting: A Miniature Tin-Glazed Earthenware Chair

Ceramics in America 2005

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Chair, London, ca. 1700–1720. Tin-glazed earthenware. H. 12 5/8". (Chipstone Foundation; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Detail of the seat of the chair illustrated in fig. 1. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Caned armchair, London, ca. 1685–1693. Walnut and cane. H. 49 1/2". (© V&A Images/Victoria and Albert Museum, London, www.vam.ac.uk.)

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Lord and Lady Clapham dolls with original miniature chairs, London, ca. 1690–1700. Dolls: wood wrapped with wool, faces gessoed and painted, with wigs of human hair. H. 21 1/2" seated. Chairs: beech and cane. H. 20 1/2". (© V&A Images/Victoria and Albert Museum, London, www.vam.ac.uk.)

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Shoe, London, 1709. Tin-glazed earthenware, decorated with the initials “ES” and the date “1709”. H. 4 1/4". (Chipstone Foundation; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Rear view of shoe illustrated in fig. 5 depicting the hand-painted initials and date on the outsole.