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Martha H. Willoughby
The Accounts of Job Townsend, Jr.

American Furniture 1999

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Chest of drawers attributed to Job Townsend, Jr., Newport, Rhode Island, 1760–1770. Mahogany with white pine, chestnut, and tulip poplar. H. 32", W. 35 3/4", D. 20 1/2". (Private collection; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Detail of the signature on the chest illustrated in fig. 1. (Courtesy, Christie’s.)

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Entry for Katherine Gould in Job Townsend, Jr.’s, daybook, July 17, 1763, p. 77. (Courtesy, Newport Historical Society; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Detail of a carved shell on the chest illustrated in fig. 1. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Detail of a brass pull on the chest illustrated in fig. 1. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Detail of the back of the brass pull illustrated in fig. 5. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figrue 7
    Figrue 7

    Desk attributed to Job Townsend, Jr., Newport, Rhode Island. Maple and mahogany with white pine, chestnut, and tulip poplar. H. 40 7/8", W. 38 5/8", D. 21 1/2". (Courtesy, Milwaukee Art Museum; gift of Mrs. William D. Hoard, Jr.)

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    Detail of the signature on the desk illustrated in fig. 7.

  • Figure 9
    Figure 9

    Entry for Nicholas Anderrese in Job Townsend, Jr.’s, daybook, February, 28, 1767, p. 96. (Courtesy, Newport Historical Society; photo, Gavin Ashworth.) The entry indicates that Job, Jr., and Edmund Townsend collaborated on Anderrese’s desk.