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Luke Beckerdite
Origins of the Rococo Style in New York Furniture and Interior Architecture

American Furniture 1993

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    First-floor southeast parlor, Philipse Manor, Yonkers, New York, 1745-1755. (New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Detail of the chimneypiece illustrated in fig. 1 (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Engraving of the first-floor southeast parlor, Philipse Manor, from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper (1882). (Collection of the Hudson River Museum of Westchester, Yonkers, New York; photo, John Kennedy.)

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Detail of the rosette of the chimneypiece illustrated in fig. 1 (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Detail of the tablet of Diana on the chimneypiece illustrated in fig. 1. (Philipse Manor Hall State Historic Site, Yonkers, NY. New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Second-floor southeast parlor, Philipse Manor. (Courtesy of Philipse Manor; Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 7
    Figure 7

    Engraving of the second-floor southeast parlor, Philipse Manor, from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper (1882). (Collection of the Hudson River Museum of Westchester, Yonkers, New York; photo, John Kennedy.)

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    Detail of the chimneypiece illustrated in fig. 6. (Courtesy of Philipse Manor; Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 9
    Figure 9

    Detail of the left side bracket of the chimneypiece illustrated in fig. 6. (Courtesy of Philipse Manor; Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 10
    Figure 10

    Detail of the frieze applique and ornament of the right door in fig. 6. (Courtesy of Philipse Manor; Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 11
    Figure 11

    Detail of the frieze applique of the chimneypiece illustrated in fig. 6. (Courtesy of Philipse Manor; Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 12
    Figure 12

    Detail of a carved stair bracket, Philipse Manor. (Courtesy of Philipse Manor; Photo, Luke Beckerdite.)

  • Figure 13
    Figure 13

    Desk-and-bookcase with carving attributed to Henry Hardcastle, New York, 1745-1755. Mahogany with tulip poplar and gum. H. 99 1/2", W. 45 1/2", D. 25". (Chipstone Foundation, acc. 1991.5; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 14
    Figure 14

    Detail of the pediment of the desk-and-bookcase illustrated in fig. 13. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) The heron, plinth, and applied carving flanking the outermost roses (approx. 6") were restored based on the carving in Philipse Manor.

  • Figure 15
    Figure 15

    Detail of the applique on the pediment of the desk-and-bookcase illustrated in fig. 13. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 16
    Figure 16

    Detail of the applique on the pediment of the desk-and-bookcase illustrated in fig. 13. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

     

  • Figure 17
    Figure 17

    Detail of left front foot and base molding of the desk-and-bookcase illustrated in fig. 13. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 18
    Figure 18

    Desk-and-bookcase with carving attributed to Henry Hardcastle, New York, 1745-1755. Mahogany with tulip poplar, gum, oak, and mahogany. Dimensions not recorded. (Private collection; courtesy, Walton Antiques.)

  • Figure 19
    Figure 19

    Detail of the prospect door of the desk-and-bookcase illustrated in fig. 18. (Private collection; courtesy, Walton Antiques.)

  • Figure 20
    Figure 20

    Bedstead with carving attributed to Henry Hardcastle, New York, 1750-1755. Mahogany with red oak and white pine (nineteenth-century lath frame and headboard). H. 89 1/2", W. 54 1/8", D. 78". (Courtesy of Historic New England/SPNEA, bequest of Janet M. Agnew, acc. 1975.152; photo, Richard Cheek.) During the late nineteenth or early twentieth century, the bedstead was reduced in width by 4-6 inches.

  • Figure 21
    Figure 21

    Detail of the knee carving on the bedstead illustrated in fig. 20. (Courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 22
    Figure 22

    Detail of the carving on a side rail of the bedstead illustrated in fig. 20. (Courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 23
    Figure 23

    Detail of the urn acanthus on a foot post of the bedstead illustrated in fig. 20. (Courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts. )

  • Figure 24
    Figure 24

    Detail of a basket capital on the bedstead illustrated in fig. 20. (Courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 25
    Figure 25

    Front view of a paw foot of the bedstead illustrated in fig. 20. (Courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 26
    Figure 26

    Side view of a paw foot of the bedstead illustrated in fig. 20. (Courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 27
    Figure 27

    Back view of a paw foot of the bedstead illustrated in fig. 20. (Courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 28
    Figure 28

    Plate 27 from Thomas Chippendale's The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director (1754, 1755). (Courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 29
    Figure 29

    Fragment of a footpost with carving attributed to the shop of Henry Hardcastle, New York, 1745-1755. Mahogany. H. 44 1/2" (Private collection; photo, Luke Beckerdite.)

  • Figure 30
    Figure 30

    Side, front, and back views of the paw foot of the footpost illustrated in fig. 29. (Private collection; photo, Luke Beckerdite.)

  • Figure 33
    Figure 33

    Card table with carving attributed to the shop of Henry Hardcastle, New York, 1750-1755. Mahogany with yellow pine. H. 28", W. 30", D. 15" (closed). (Chipstone Foundation, acc. 1965.5; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 34
    Figure 34

    Detail of the knee carving and fluted and gadrooned molding of the card table illustrated in fig. 33. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 35
    Figure 35

    Chest of drawers with carving attributed to the shop of Henry Hardcastle, New York, 1750-1755. Mahogany with tulip poplar. H. 33", W 35 1/2", D. 20 3/4". (Courtesy, Winterthur Museum, acc. G54.86.)

  • Figure 36
    Figure 36

    Detail of the left foot carving and fluted and gadrooned molding on the chest of drawers illustrated in fig. 35. (Courtesy, Winterthur Museum.)

  • Figure 37
    Figure 37

    Footposts of a bedstead with carving attributed to Henry Hardcastle, New York, 1750-1755. Mahogany. H. 94". (Chipstone Foundation, acc. 1991.4; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 38
    Figure 38

    Detail of the carving on the footposts illustrated in fig. 37. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 39
    Figure 39

    Detail of the carving on the footposts illustrated in fig. 37. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 40
    Figure 40

    Plate 31 from Thomas Chippendale's The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director (1754,1755) (Courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 41
    Figure 41

    Detail of the mortises for a rail and spring rod on the footposts illustrated in fig. 37. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 42
    Figure 42

    Armchair with carving attributed to the shop of Henry Hardcastle, Charleston, South Carolina, 1755-1756. Mahogany with sweet gum. H. 53 3/8", W, 37 5/8" (at arms). (Collection of The McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina; photo courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 43
    Figure 43

    Detail of the knee carving on the armchair illustrated in fig. 42. (Collection of The McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina; photo courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 44
    Figure 44

    Front view of a paw foot of the armchair illustrated in fig. 42. (Collection of The McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina; photo courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 45
    Figure 45

    Side view of a paw foot of the armchair illustrated in fig. 42 (Collection of The McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina; photo courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)

  • Figure 46
    Figure 46

    Rear view of a paw foot of the armchair illustrated in fig. 42. (Collection of The McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina; photo courtesy, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.)