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Edward S. Cooke, Jr.
Scandinavian Modern Furniture in the Arts and Crafts Period: The Collaboration of the Greenes and the Halls

American Furniture 1993

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Table, designed and made by Charles Sumner Greene, Pasadena, 1900. Wood. (Private collection; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Bureau, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henrv Mather Greene for the Jennie Reeve house, Long Beach, California, probably Pasadena, ca. 1904. Oak and cedar. (Private collection; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Desk, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henrv Mather Greene for the Adelaide Tichenor house, Long Beach, California, probably Pasadena, ca. 1904. Ash. (Private collection; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Entry hall in the Henry Robinson house, Pasadena, 1906—1907. (Photo, Documents Collection, Charles Sumner Greene Collection (1959-1) Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley.)

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Library table, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene for the Henry Robinson house, Pasadena, 1906—1907. (Private collection; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Drawing of a hall table in the Henry Robinson house, Pasadena, 1906—I907. (Photo, Drawings and Archives, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University in the City of New York.)

  • Figure 7
    Figure 7

    Dining-room furniture, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop for the Henry Robinson house, Pasadena, 1906—1907 (in recreated setting). Mahogany. (Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    Sideboard, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop for the Henry Robinson house, Pasadena, 1906—1907. Mahogany. (Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 9
    Figure 9

    Desk, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop for the Henry Robinson house, Pasadena, 1906—1907 Mahogany. (Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 10
    Figure 10

    Chiffonier, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop for the master bedroom of the David Gamble house, Pasadena, 1908—1909. Mahogany, ebony, and oak; fruitwood inlay. (The Gamble House; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 11
    Figure 11

    Detail of drawer construction of the chiffonier in fig. 10. (Photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 12
    Figure 12

    Dressing table, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop for the guest room of the David Gamble house, Pasadena, 1908—1909. Maple, ebony, and oak; silver and ivory inlay. (The Gamble House; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 13
    Figure 13

    Detail of drawer construction of the table in fig. 12. (Photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 14
    Figure 14

    Armchair, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop for the Robert Blacker house, Pasadena, 1908—1909. Mahogany, ebony; fruitwood, silver, and copper inlay. (Los Angeles County Museum of Art, gift of Max Palevsky in honor of the museum's twenty-fifth anniversary.)

  • Figure 15
    Figure 15

    Photograph of X ray of detail where the splat is joined to the rear seat rail of the chair in fig. 14. (Photo, Los Angeles County Museum of Art.)

  • Figure 16
    Figure 16

    Photograph of X ray of detail where the splat is joined to the crest rail of the chair in fig. 14. (Photo, Los Angeles County Museum of Art.)

  • Figure 17
    Figure 17

    Photograph of X ray of detail where the arm is secured to the front post of the chair in fig. 14. (Photo, Los Angeles County Museum of Art.)

  • Figure 18
    Figure 18

    Bench, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop for the Robert Blacker house, Pasadena, 1908—1909. Mahogany, ebony, oak. (Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Reproduced with permission. ©Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. All rights reserved.)

  • Figure 19
    Figure 19

    Photograph of X ray of detail where the batten is secured to the top board of the bench in fig. 18. View is from above the seating surface. (X ray ©Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; photo, Edward S. Cooke.)

  • Figure 20
    Figure 20

    Detail of underside of the bench in fig. 18. (Photo, ©Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.)

  • Figure 21
    Figure 21

    Photograph of X ray of detail where the knee bracket and rail are secured to the front leg of the bench in fig. 18. (X ray ©Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; photo, Edward S. Cooke.)

  • Figure 22
    Figure 22

    Cabinet, designed and made by Gottlob Karl Lapple, Pasadena, 1915—1930. Oak, ebony, and yellow poplar. (Private collection; photo, Edward S. Cooke.)

  • Figure 23
    Figure 23

    Detail of drawer from the cabinet in fig. 22. (Photo, Edward S. Cooke.)

  • Figure 24
    Figure 24

    Sideboard, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henrv Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop for the William Thorsen house, Berkeley, California, 1909—1910. Mahogany and ebony; fruitwood and motherof pearl inlay. (Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 25
    Figure 25

    Dining room in the Cordelia Culbertson house, Pasadena, 1911—1913. Furniture designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop. (Photo from original in the Greene and Greene Library, Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.)

  • Figure 26
    Figure 26

    Sideboard, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene and made by the Hall shop for the Charles Sumner Greene house, Pasadena, 1912—1913. Mahogany and oak. (Private collection; photo, Marvin Rand.)

  • Figure 27
    Figure 27

    Box, Hall Manufacturing Company, Pasadena, 1918—1921. Redwood. (Private collection; photo, Edward S. Cooke.)

  • Figure 28
    Figure 28

    Interior of the Hall Manufacturing Company, Pasadena, 1918—1921. (Photo from original in the Greene and Greene Library, Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.)

  • Figure 29
    Figure 29

    Gaming table and chairs, designed by Charles Sumner Greene and probably made by John Hall with carving by Charles Sumner Greene for the Mortimer Fleishhacker house, Woodside, California, 1923—1925. Mahogany; leather. (Photo from original in the Greene and Greene Library, Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.)