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Luke Beckerdite and Robert Hunter
Collectors and Scholars of North Carolina Earthenware

Ceramics in America 2010

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Shop sign made during Gottfried Aust’s tenure as master of the pottery at Salem, North Carolina, 1773. Lead-glazed earthenware. D. 21 3/4". (Courtesy, Wachovia Historical Society; unless otherwise noted, photos by Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    “Additions to Collection of Relics in 1907–8,” Wachovia Historical Society, Salem, North Carolina, 1908. (Courtesy, Wachovia Historical Society.)

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Potter’s wheel, Bethabara or Salem, North Carolina, 1756–1800. (Courtesy, Wachovia Historical Society.)

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Glaze mill, Bethabara or Salem, North Carolina, 1756–1800. (Courtesy, Wachovia Historical Society.)

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Ribs, Bethabara or Salem, North Carolina, 1780–1820. Brass. (Courtesy, Wachovia Historical Society.) 

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Photograph of Joe Kindig Jr., York, Pennsylvania, ca. 1960. Kindig was considered by many to be the most knowledgeable antique dealer of his generation.

  • Figure 7
    Figure 7

    Joe Kindig Jr., “A Note on Early North Carolina Pottery,” The Magazine Antiques 27, no. 1 (January 1935): 15. The pitcher, large sugar pot, and dish are in the collection of The Henry Ford, Dearborn, Michigan; the small sugar pot, fat lamp, and mug are owned by Old Salem Museums & Gardens. All of the pottery illustrated in Kindig’s article is now attributed to Alamance County, based on research presented in this volume of Ceramics in America.

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    Dish, Alamance County, North Carolina, 1785–1810. Lead-glazed earthenware. D. 12 1/2". (Courtesy, The Henry Ford.) Joe Kindig owned this dish and described it in “A Note on Early North Carolina Pottery” (fig. 7).

  • Figure 9
    Figure 9

    Advertisement by Joe Kindig Jr., The Magazine Antiques 27, no. 4 (April 1935): 121. 

  • Figure 10
    Figure 10

    Frank Horton cataloging timbers from the Levering House, Salem, North Carolina, ca. 1971.

  • Figure 11
    Figure 11

    View of a pottery display in the Boys School, Salem, North Carolina, ca. 1956. 

  • Figure 12
    Figure 12

    Dish, Alamance County, North Carolina, 1790–1820. Lead-glazed earthenware. D. 10 7/8". (Courtesy, Old Salem Museums & Gardens.)

  • Figure 13
    Figure 13

    Dish, Alamance County, North Carolina, 1790–1820. Lead-glazed earthenware. D. 10". (Courtesy, Old Salem Museums & Gardens.) 

  • Figure 14
    Figure 14

    Sugar pot, Alamance County, North Carolina, 1790–1810. Lead-glazed earthenware. H. 10". (Courtesy, Old Salem Museums & Gardens.)

  • Figure 15
    Figure 15

    Stanley South, 2008. (Photo, Chester DePratter.)

  • Figure 16
    Figure 16

    Photograph of John Bivins Jr. and Bradford Rauschenberg taken for the dust jacket of their book The Furniture of Charleston, 1680–1820 (Winston-Salem, N.C.: Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, 2003).

  • Figure 17
    Figure 17

    Left: Dorothy Auman, ca. 1982; right: Walter Auman, 1969. (Courtesy, Auman family.)

  • Figure 18
    Figure 18

    Interior view of the North Carolina Pottery Center, Seagrove, North Carolina, ca. 2008. This installation is reminiscent of the displays at the Seagrove Pottery Museum.

  • Figure 19
    Figure 19

    Charles G. Zug III, ca. 2004.