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Elizabeth A. Fleming
Cultural Negotiations: A Study of the New Mexican Caja

American Furniture 2000

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Caja, New Mexico, 1760–1800. Pine. H. 30", W. 55", D. 19". (Courtesy, Sotheby’s.)

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Detail of the side of the caja illustrated in fig. 1.

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Chest, Hadley-Hatfield area of Massachusetts, ca. 1710. Oak with pine. H. 45", W. 36", D. 19 3/4". (Courtesy, Chipstone Foundation; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Caja, New Mexico, 1760–1800. Pine. H. 23", W. 47", D. 21". (Courtesy, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Taylor Museum.)

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Caja, New Mexico, 1760–1800. Pine. H. 22 1/2", W. 34 1/2", D. 17 1/4". (Courtesy, Sotheby’s.)

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Caja, New Mexico, 1760–1800. Pine. H. 32 1/2", W. 37 1/2", D. 17". (Courtesy, Sotheby’s.)

  • Figure 7
    Figure 7

    Saint Anthony of Padua and the Infant Jesus, Santo Domingo Pueblo, New Mexico, 1693–1710. Painted hide. 46 1/2" x 26 3/8". (Courtesy, Division of Cultural History, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.)

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    Tusayan storage jar, New Mexico, 1100–1300 A.D. Earthenware with black-on-white decoration. H. 14". (Courtesy,
    Sotheby’s.)

  • Figure 9
    Figure 9

    Taos Pueblo, Taos, New Mexico. (Courtesy, Museum of New Mexico.) This image shows the Taos Pueblo as it appeared about 1880.

  • Figure 10
    Figure 10

    Caja, New Mexico, 1760–1800. Pine. H. 22", W. 44", D. 201/2". (Courtesy, Sotheby’s.)

  • Figure 11
    Figure 11

    Caja, New Mexico, 1760–1800. Pine. H. 18 1/2", W. 37", D. 19". (Courtesy, Sotheby’s.)

  • Figure 12
    Figure 12

    Detail of an interior wall of La Hacienda de los Martinez, Taos, New Mexico, ca. 1805. (Photo, Anthony Richardson.)

  • Figure 13
    Figure 13

    Detail of the ceilings of La Hacienda de los Martinez, Taos, New Mexico, ca. 1805, showing (left) aspen or cottonwood latillas (poles) and (right) split cedar or pine rajas (boards). (Photo, Anthony Richardson.)

  • Figure 14
    Figure 14

    Caja, New Mexico, 1750–1800. Pine. H. 15 1/2", W. 33", D. 13 1/2". (Courtesy, Sotheby’s).

  • Figure 15
    Figure 15

    Caja, New Mexico, 1760–1800. Pine. H. 20 1/2", W. 38 1/2", D. 19". (Courtesy, Sotheby’s).

  • Figure 16
    Figure 16

    Refectory table, Spain, 1600–1700. Oak. Dimensions not recorded. (Courtesy, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston.)

  • Figure 17
    Figure 17

    Chest, Spain, 1600–1700. Oak. Dimensions not recorded. (Courtesy, Hispanic Society of America, New York.)

  • Figure 18
    Figure 18

    Design for a coat-of-arms, Spain, Origen y Armas de varios nobles de Espána. (Courtesy, Biblioteca de la Universidad de Zaragoza, ms. no. 198.)

  • Figure 19
    Figure 19

    Zuni bowl, New Mexico, ca. 1890. Earthenware with polychrome decoration. H. 6 1/2", Diam. 16 1/2". (Courtesy, Margorie and Charles Benton, Evanston, Illinois.)

  • Figure 20
    Figure 20

    Kiva interior, Meshongnovi Hopi village, Arizona, c. 1902. (Courtesy, Field Museum.)

  • Figure 21
    Figure 21

    Design from Mimbres bowl, New Mexico, 900–1200 A.D. Earthenware with black-on-white decoration. Dimensions not recorded. (Courtesy, Patricia Carr, Mimbres Mythology, 1979.)

  • Figure 22
    Figure 22

    Navajo saddle blanket, New Mexico, 1880–1900. 32" x 28". (Courtesy, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology, Museum of New Mexico.)