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Warren F. Hartmann
The Stoneware of Early Albany: A Mystery Solved

Ceramics in America 2012

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Storage pot (front and back), attributed to William Capron Pottery, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 10". (All objects courtesy of the author; photos by the author.) 

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Storage pot, attributed to William Capron Pottery, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 12". The incised decoration, filed with an unusual manganese slip, shows a bird on a branch feeding on berries. The reverse has an incised floral design.

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Storage pot, attributed to William Capron Pottery, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 11". On the reverse is an identical bind, filled with the same unusual manganese colored slip used on the pot illustrated in fig. 2.

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Jug, attributed to William Capron Pottery, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 15 3/4". Incised bird with cobalt decoration.

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Storage pot (front and back), attributed to William Capron Pottery, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 13". This is one of the most beautiful incised bird decorations found on Albany stoneware; the incised floral decoration on the reverse is also compelling. 

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Storage pot, attributed to William Capron Pottery, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 12". A three-gallon jar with incised abstract floral decoration. The identical design is on the reverse. 

  • Figure 7
    Figure 7

    Storage pot, attributed to William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 15". The same decoration is found on the reverse of this 4-gallon vessel. 

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    Jug, attributed to William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 13". 

  • Figure 9
    Figure 9

    Storage pot, attributed to William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 16". The impressed decoration of a covered urn is a Masonic emblem.

  • Figure 10
    Figure 10

    Storage pot, attributed to William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 13". This jar bears an unusual incised jester decoration, with incised floral on the reverse. 

  • Figure 11
    Figure 11

    Jug, attributed to William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 16". The incised decoration shows the body of a seal with a head of a bird, an extremely unusual motif.

  • Figure 12
    Figure 12

    Jug, attributed to William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 10". This jug displays another unusual decorative slip design, of an animal, perhaps a dog. 

  • Figure 13
    Figure 13

    Jug, attributed to William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 15".  Mark, above cartouche: VULTURED [to be drunk]. The incised vulture perched on a limb in the cartouche is extremely unusual.

  • Figure 14
    Figure 14

    Jug and storage jar, attributed to William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. of jug 14"; H. of jar 12". 

  • Figure 15
    Figure 15

    Jugs, attributed to William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. of each 7". 

  • Figure 16
    Figure 16

    Storage pots, William Capron, Albany, New York, 1800–1801. Salt-glazed stoneware. Left: 1-gallon jar. H. 10". Right: 2-gallon jar. H. 13". Impressed on both sides of each: ALBANY / WARE.

  • Figure 17
    Figure 17

    Detail of the 1-gallon jar illustrated in fig. 16.