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Edward A. Chappell
Pride Flared Up: Zuni (A:shiwi) Pottery and the Nahohai Family

Ceramics in America 2015

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Zuni water jar, 1880–1895, in the St. George Tucker House dining room, Williamsburg, Virginia, 1986. (Courtesy, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation; photo, Willie Graham.)

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Randy Nahohai, 2011. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Decorating Pottery, engraving by H. F. Farny, published in Frank Hamilton Cushing, “My Adventures in Zuñi,” Century Magazine 25, no. 2 (December 1882): 201. (Courtesy, Cornell University.)

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Pueblo of Zuni, 1879. (Photo, John K. Hillers; courtesy, Cowan’s Auctions.) Hillers accompanied James and Matilda Stevenson and Frank Hamilton Cushing to Zuni.)

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Young Zuni woman with water jar, 1873. (Photo, Corps of Engineers, attributed to Timothy O’Sullivan; author’s collection.)

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Bottomless jars used in con­structing chimneys, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1879. (Photo, John K. Hillers; courtesy, Cowan’s Auctions.) 

  • Figure 7
    Figure 7

    Terraced bowls collected by James Stevenson at Zuni in 1879, published by Bureau of Ethnology, Annual Report, 1883, figs. 448–53. (Courtesy, Smithsonian Institution.)

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    Zuni house interior with plain walls, masonry benches, and water jars, 1899. (Courtesy, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution; photo, Adam Clark Vroman, NAA. GN02297.) 

  • Figure 9
    Figure 9

    Zuni house interior with women burnishing and painting pottery, 1899. (Courtesy, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution; photo, Adam Clark Vroman, NAA. GN02265.) 

  • Figure 10
    Figure 10

    Zuni vessels assembled for the tourist trade, ca. 1900. (Photo, author’s collection.)

  • Figure 11
    Figure 11

    Photograph showing aestheticization of Zuni vessels, in sharp contrast to the earlier view in fig. 10. (Photo, Burton Frasher; author’s collection.) The jars are probably by Tsayutitsa, ca. 1930. 

  • Figure 12
    Figure 12

    Sikyatki Revival bowl with avian motif, Daisy Hooee Nampeyo, Hopi-Tewa, 1950–1970. Earthenware. D. 8 1/4". (Photo courtesy, Quinn's Auction.) In shape, color, and motifs, this vessel is quite unlike those she taught Zuni students to make.

  • Figure 13
    Figure 13

    Jar, Eudora Montoya, Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico, 1960–1970. Earthenware. H. 7". (Unless otherwise noted, all objects in author’s collection; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 14
    Figure 14

    Jars, John Montoya, Sandia Pueblo, New Mexico, 1994. Earthenware. H. of tallest 3 1/2", H. of shortest 1 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 15
    Figure 15

    Jars, Kewa Pueblo, New Mexico. Earthenware. Left: Andrew William Pacheco, 1990. H. 4 3/4". Center: Robert Tenorio, ca. 1988–1989. H. 5 7/8". Right: Andrew William Pacheco, 1991. H. 5 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 16
    Figure 16

    Objects by Diego Romero and Santiago Romero, Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico. Earthenware. Left: Bowl, Diego Romero, 2006. D. 8 1/2". Inscribed “American Highway: Still Truckin’.” Center: “Desert Lylee” (Romero family dog), Santiago Romero, 2012. H. 10 5/8". Unmarked. Right: Bowl, Diego Romero, ca. 2008. D. 7". Inscribed “On the Green” (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 17
    Figure 17

    Lizard jar, Teresita Romero, Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico, 1950–1975. Earthenware. H. 6". (Photo, Gavin ­Ashworth.)

  • Figure 18
    Figure 18

    Jar, Tsayutitsa, owned by Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1939. Earthenware. H. 21 5/8". (Courtesy, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.)

  • Figure 19
    Figure 19

    Zuni women with water jars, ca. 1931. (Photo, Burton Frasher; author’s collection.)

  • Figure 20
    Figure 20

    Zuni pottery owls, New Mexico, ca. 1950–2015. Earthenware. Back row: Unidetsa Kallestewa, Erma Kalestewa Homer, and Myra Eracho; middle row: Spotted-Feather Owl Potter, Bica-Kalestewa family, Eileen Yatsattie, Quanita Kalestewa, and Zoe Jarmon (two); front row: Spotted-Feather Owl Potter (two), Josephine Nahohai, Erma Homer, Nellie Bica, Nellie Bica and Erma Homer, Rowena Kalestewa, Erma Homer, Celecita Vicente, and Sadie Tsipa. H. of tallest 11", H. of shortest 2 3/8". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 21
    Figure 21

    Lawsaiyatesetsa (far left, back row) at Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial, 1937. (Photo, H. Eisenhand; author’s collection.) She carries a jar different from the Deer in His House and Rainbird jars carried by the younger women.

  • Figure 22
    Figure 22

    Lawsaiyatesetsa (far left) at Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial, 1938. (Photo, Burton Frasher; author’s collection.)

  • Figure 23
    Figure 23

    Jars, Tsaw-a:si, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1951. Earthenware. H. 6 1/2", 9 1/4". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 24
    Figure 24

    Offering bowls by (left to right) Erma Kalestewa Homer, Eileen Yatsattie, and Brandon Kallestewa, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, ca. 1995, ca. 2000, 2004. Earthenware. D. 7 1/4", 8”, 6 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) The bowl on the far right is slipcast.

  • Figure 25
    Figure 25

    Erma Kalestewa Homer holding a stew bowl made by her grandmother Nellie Bica in about 1980. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 26
    Figure 26

    Pitcher for Rain Priests, Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, ca. 1987. Earthenware. H. approx. 11". (Photo, courtesy Milford and Randy Nahohai.)

  • Figure 27
    Figure 27

    Bowls for Rain Priests, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, (left to right) 1986–1990, 1945–1960, 1980–1985. Earthenware. W. (left to right) 12", 9 3/8", 11 3/4". (Courtesy, Eileen Yatsattie; photo, Edward Chappell.) The bowls on the right and left are Eileen Yatsattie’s first and second replacements for the center bowl, by Margaret Walela.

  • Figure 28
    Figure 28

    Left and right: Jars, Jack Kalestewa, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1985–1990. Earthenware. H. 5 1/4", 6 1/2". Center: Cornmeal bowl, Quanita Kalestewa, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1985–1990. Earthenware. W. 10". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 29
    Figure 29

    Jar decorated with Deer in His House motif, Nellie Bica, painted by Erma Kalestewa Homer, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, ca. 1985. Earthenware. H. 9 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 30
    Figure 30

    Zuni River and town viewed from the south, ca. 1920, when Josephine Nahohai was a young girl. (Photo, author’s collection.)

  • Figure 31
    Figure 31

    Plate with He-lele Ko’hanna figure painted by Dixon Shebala after industrial firing, 1962. Stoneware. D. 10 1/4". Signed on obverse: “Shebala – 62"; mark on reverse: “BAUER CALIF-U.S.A.” (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 32
    Figure 32

    Josephine and Nat Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, ca. 1945. (Photo, courtesy of Milford and Randy Nahohai.)

  • Figure 33
    Figure 33

    Jar, Myra Eriacho, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1950–1960. Earthenware. H. 4 3/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 34
    Figure 34

    Jar, Ethel Youvella, Tewa-Hopi, Polacca, Arizona, 1975–1990. Earthenware. D. 10 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 35
    Figure 35

    Zuni potter Kyusita, also called Cayusetsa, applying coils of clay, 1918. (Photo, George H. Pepper; author’s collection.)

  • Figure 36
    Figure 36

    Unfired jar, Quanita Kalestewa, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987. Earthenware, painted with hematite brown and yellow ochre over kaolin slip. D. 6 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 37
    Figure 37

    Kyusita, having stacked dried dung over unfired pottery, 1918. (Photo, George H. Pepper; author’s collection.) 

  • Figure 38
    Figure 38

    Zuni woman firing pottery, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1932. (Photo, Burton Frasher; author’s collection.)

  • Figure 39
    Figure 39

    Owl, Josephine Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, ca. 1960. Earthenware. H. 9 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 40
    Figure 40

    Jar, Josephine Nahohai, painted by Nat Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, ca. 1965–1975. Earthenware. H. 4 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 41
    Figure 41

    Jars, Josephine Nahohai, painted by Nat Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1975–1982. Earthenware. H. (left to right) 4 1/4", 9 1/2", 7". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) The two smaller jars have white slip; the larger one is unslipped. 

  • Figure 42
    Figure 42

    Josephine Nahohai (second from left) performing with Olla Maidens at Heard Museum, Phoenix, 1982. (Photo, courtesy Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives, Heard Museum, call number PCD:199B 1276589_0042.) Josephine is balancing a slipcast jar painted by Randy Nahohai.

  • Figure 43
    Figure 43

    Owl by Jaycee Nahohai that broke during outside firing, 2010. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 44
    Figure 44

    Frog bowls (left and center), Josephine Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1970–1984. Earthenware. W. 6 3/8", 6 3/4". Turtle bowl (right), Josephine and ­Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1986. Earthenware. W. 6 3/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 45
    Figure 45

    Jar, Josephine and Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1986. Earthenware. H. 9". (Courtesy, the School for Advanced Research, SAR.1986-16-1; photo, Addison Doty.)

  • Figure 46
    Figure 46

    Cornmeal bowls by Josephine Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1975–1985. Earthenware. Left: Painted by Josephine Nahohai. W. 6". Center: Painted by Nat Nahohai. W. 6 3/8". Right: Painted by Randy Nahohai, who regularized Josephine’s terraces by applying a black border and ornamented the bowl with tadpoles and dragonflies. W. 6". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 47
    Figure 47

    Jar, Josephine Nahohai, painted by Randy Nahohai with Deer in His House motifs, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1978–1984. Earthenware. H. 9 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 48
    Figure 48

    Side view of the jar illustrated in fig. 47, showing dagger motifs flanking doubled and quadrupled frets. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 49
    Figure 49

    Jar, Josephine and Randy ­Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1985. Earthenware. H. 8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 50
    Figure 50

    Jar, Josephine, Randy, and Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1983. Earthenware. H. 8 1/4". (Courtesy, Heard Museum Collection, object number NA-SW-ZU-A7-44; photo, Craig Smith.)

  • Figure 51
    Figure 51

    Randy Nahohai with stew bowl made for his mother as part of a set for Cindy Tsethlikai’s Shalako house ceremony, 1978. W. 14 1/4". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 52
    Figure 52

    Corn figure, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1984. Earthenware. H. 8 1/4". (Courtesy, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian.)

  • Figure 53
    Figure 53

    Seed jars, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1984. Earthenware. H. of larger jar approx. 5". (Photo, courtesy Randy Nahohai.)

  • Figure 54
    Figure 54

    Vera Eustice in costume carrying a jar decorated with pairs of capped spirals, daggers, and circles, ca. 1940. (Photo, Burton Frasher; author’s collection.)

  • Figure 55
    Figure 55

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1985. Earthenware. H. 5 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 56
    Figure 56

    Rose Gasper, Josephine Nahohai and Eloise Westika sketching designs from Zuni pottery at the School of American (now Advanced) Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. (Photo, Stephen Trimble.) 

  • Figure 57
    Figure 57

    Jar, Eloise Westika, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1980–1990. Earthenware. H. 4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 58
    Figure 58

    Jars, decorated with Bird in Its House designs, Josephine and Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, ca. 1985 (left), 1986 (right). Earthenware. H. 9", 7 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 59
    Figure 59

    Spacer panel with crooked circle motif on the ca. 1985 jar illustrated on the left in fig. 58, painted by Randy Nahohai. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 60
    Figure 60

    Rainbird jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1985. Earthenware. Dimensions unknown. (Photo, courtesy Milford Nahohai.)

  • Figure  61
    Figure 61

    Nahohai family (clockwise from upper left): Milford with Randy’s 1985 Rainbird jar, Randy holding newborn Jaycee, Rowena Him with a pottery owl by Josephine, and Josephine with a Rainbird bowl by Randy. (Photo, Steven Trimble.)

  • Figure 62
    Figure 62

    Fragmentary Kiapkwa Polychrome dough bowl from Zuni, ca. 1830. Earthenware. W. 17". (Courtesy, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.)

  • Figure 63
    Figure 63

    Jar, Josephine Nahohai, painted by Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1986. Earthenware. H. 9 7/8". Catalogue No. 87.48.20 (Courtesy, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico.) 

  • Figure 64
    Figure 64

    Sketches for directional figures and Rainbirds, Randy Nahohai, 1986. Graphite, ink, and colored pencil on paper. 10 3/4" x 14". (Courtesy, Randy Nahohai.)

  • Figure 65
    Figure 65

    65  Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1988. Earthenware. H. 14 1/2". (Courtesy, Milford Nahohai; photo, Edward Chappell.) 

  • Figure 66
    Figure 66

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1998. Earthenware. H. 10 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 67
    Figure 67

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1997. Earthenware. H. 8 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 68
    Figure 68

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1998. Earthenware. D. 10 1/2". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 69
    Figure 69

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1988. Earthenware. H. 8 5/8". (Photo, National Museum of the American Indian.) 

  • Figure 70
    Figure 70

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987. Earthenware. H. 10". (Courtesy, Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, Indianapolis.)

  • Figure 71
    Figure 71

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987. Earthenware. H. 7 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 72
    Figure 72

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987. Earthenware. H. 12 1/2". (Photo, Bonhams.) 

  • Figure 73
    Figure 73

    Sketches for geometric and directional figures, Randy Nahohai, ca. 1986. Graphite and ink on paper. 10 3/4" x 14 1/8". (Courtesy, Randy Nahohai.)

  • Figure 74
    Figure 74

    Sketches for Rainbird evolution, Randy Nahohai, 1986. Graphite, ink, and red pencil on paper. 10 3/4" x 14". (Courtesy, Randy Nahohai.)

  • Figure 75
    Figure 75

    Rainbird jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1985. H. 9". (Courtesy, Treadway Gallery.) 

  • Figure76
    Figure76

    Rainbird motif, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 77
    Figure 77

    Jars, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987. Earthenware. H. 12 1/2" (left), 9 5/8" (right). (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 78
    Figure 78

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1988. Earthenware. H. 12 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 79
    Figure 79

    Jar decorated with hanging cloud motifs, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1988. Earthenware. H. 14". (Courtesy, John Barry.) 

  • Figure 80
    Figure 80

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987. Earthenware. H. 10 3/4". (Courtesy, Heard Museum, object number 4070-1; photo, courtesy Milford Nahohai.)

  • Figure 81
    Figure 81

    Corrugated pottery sherd from surface at Hawikuh village, precontact. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 82
    Figure 82

    Jars, two with corrugated necks, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987–1988. Earthenware. (Courtesy, Randy Nahohai; photo, Randy Nahohai.)

  • Figure 83
    Figure 83

    Hawikuh Polychrome jar fragment, glaze-painted, 1630–1680. (Courtesy, Milford and Randy Nahohai; photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 84
    Figure 84

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1988. Earthenware. D. 12 1/2". (Courtesy, the School for Advanced Research, SAR.1994-4-600; photo, Addison Doty.) 

  • Figure 85
    Figure 85

    Bowl made for Brenda Shears, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987. Earthenware. D. 8 1/4". (Courtesy, Keith Kintigh and Brenda Shears; photo, Brenda Shears.) 

  • Figure 86
    Figure 86

    Hawikuh flying saucer jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1989. Earthenware. D. 14 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 87
    Figure 87

    Jar (top) and bowl (bottom) with Rainbird compositions, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1990 (jar), 1991 (bowl). Earthenware. D. 11 1/2", 12 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 88
    Figure 88

    Two sheets of designs for painting jars, Randy Nahohai, 1989, inspired primarily by William Baake’s drawings of pottery excavated at Hawikuh. Graphite on paper. 14" x 11". The rough sketch for a flying saucer jar viewed from the side is labeled “10–12 white for Brenda Shears” on the left. (Courtesy, Randy Nahohai.)

  • Figure 89
    Figure 89

    Jars, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1989. Earthenware. D. 8 1/8" (left), 5 7/8" (right). (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 90
    Figure 90

    Jar decorated with designs drawn from Matsaki Polychrome vessels, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1989. Earthenware. D. 13 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 91
    Figure 91

    Randy and Jaycee Nahohai with jar, 1989. (Photo, James Ostler, courtesy Milford and Randy Nahohai.)

  • Figure 92
    Figure 92

    Bowl decorated with Antelope motif, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1992. Earthenware. D. 8 1/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 93
    Figure 93

    Bowl decorated with Flute Player motif, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1992. Earthenware. D. 9". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 94
    Figure 94

    Bowls with flared rims and ­corrugated coils, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1992 (left), 1991 (right). Earthenware. Left: white-slipped exterior with rose-painted coil. D. 8 1/8". Right: orange-slipped exterior with unburnished coil. D. 12 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 95
    Figure 95

    Bowl decorated with Wood Rat motif, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1992. Earthenware. D. 8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 96
    Figure 96

    Bowl, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1990. Earthenware. D. 7 5/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 97
    Figure 97

    Bowl decorated with design inspired by a 1350–1450 Gila Polychrome jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1992. Earthenware, with unslipped surface. D. 7 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 98
    Figure 98

    Bowl decorated with Knifewing motif, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2009. Earthenware. D. 8 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 99
    Figure 99

    Bowl decorated with Longhair motif, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico. Earthenware. D. 7 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 100
    Figure 100

    Bowl, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2009. Earthenware. D. 7 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 101
    Figure 101

    Bowl, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2009. Earthenware. D. 7 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 102
    Figure 102

    Kaleidoscope jars, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2007. Earthenware. H. 7 5/8" (left), 8" (right). (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 103
    Figure 103

    Flute player rock art, Village of the Great Kivas, Zuni, precontact. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 104
    Figure 104

    Cornmeal bowl decorated with flute players and frogs, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1988. Earthenware. W. 8 3/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 105
    Figure 105

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, 1990. Earthenware. H. 12 1/8". (Courtesy, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.) 

  • Figure 106
    Figure 106

    106  Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1991. Earthenware. H. 14". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) The stains running down the face of the jar and the inverted brown handprints (as at the center) are applied before the figures and multiple white cloud motifs.

  • Figure 107
    Figure 107

    Detail of the cliff-faced belly on the jar illustrated in fig. 106, showing petroglyph, Hanging Cloud motif, and flute player. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 108
    Figure 108

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1991. Earthenware. D. 14". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) This view of the top shows six painted terraces, cloud motifs, and dragonflies.

  • Figure 109
    Figure 109

    Rainbird sketches, Randy Nahohai, 1985. Graphite, ink, and colored pencil on paper. 14" x 10 3/4". (Courtesy, Randy Nahohai.) Randy drew the more conventional Rainbird patterns at upper left before painting the 1985 jar illustrated in fig. 60.

  • Figure 110
    Figure 110

    Rainbird jars, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1999 (left), 2007 (right). Earthenware. H. 8 1/2", 7 3/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 111
    Figure 111

    Jars decorated with deer, antelope, and rams, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2006 (left), 1996 (center), 2010 (right). Earthenware. H. 6 7/8", 6 5/8", 6 3/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) Micaceous orange slip is hand-rubbed inside the lip of all three and on the outside of the jar on the far right. Flute players are painted on the lower body of the middle jar.

  • Figure 112
    Figure 112

    Jars decorated with Deer in His House motifs, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1999 (left and center), 2002 (right). Earthenware. H. 7 3/8", 7 5/8", 7 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) Micaceous orange slip is hand-rubbed inside the lips and some mica is included in the unsmoothed brown.

  • Figure 113
    Figure 113

    Jar decorated with Corn Maiden scenes, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1994. Earthenware. H. 12 1/8". (Courtesy, Denver Art Museum.)

  • Figure 114
    Figure 114

    Cornmeal bowl, Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1987. Earthenware. H. 4 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 115
    Figure 115

    Cornmeal bowls decorated with frog (left) and frogless (right) pattern, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1992. Earthenware. W. 10 1/2", 8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 116
    Figure 116

    Cornmeal bowls decorated with frog figures, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2009 (top), 2011 (bottom). Earthenware. W. 6 1/2", 6 3/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 117
    Figure 117

    Frog and lizard flutes, 2004 (left), 2007 (center), 2011 (right). Earthenware. L. 7", 3 1/2", 7". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 118
    Figure 118

    Frog jars, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2002 (left), 2006 (center), 2009 (right). Earthenware. H. 5 1/2", 6 1/2", 5 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) Micaceous orange slip covers the outside and extends inside the lip.

  • Figure 119
    Figure 119

    Jar, “Frog on Maize,” Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2008. Earthenware. H. 6 1/4", D. 7 1/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 120
    Figure 120

    Top view of the jar illustrated in fig. 119. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 121
    Figure 121

    Jars decorated with cloud patterns, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1999 (left), 2012 (center), 2009 (right). Earthenware. H. 5", D. 8 1/4", H. 5". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 122
    Figure 122

    Tularosa Star, the center jar illustrated in fig. 121. H. 7 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 123
    Figure 123

    Top view of the center jar illustrated in fig. 121, showing penciled guidelines. (Photo, Edward Chappell.) 

  • Figure 124
    Figure 124

    Dragonfly motif on a potsherd from the surface at the Hawikuh site, seventeenth century. (Photo, Edward Chappell.) 

  • Figure 125
    Figure 125

    Cornmeal bowls with Milky Way decoration, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2002 (top) and 2009 (bottom). Earthenware. W. 7 1/8" and 8 3/4". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 126
    Figure 126

    Cornmeal bowl, Josephine Nahohai, painted by her grandson Dion Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1989–1992. Earthenware. W. 6 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 127
    Figure 127

    Cornmeal bowls, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2002 (left), 2013 (center), 2009 (right). Earthenware. D. 7 1/8", 8 3/4", 6 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 128
    Figure 128

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2008. Earthenware. H. 5 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 129
    Figure 129

    Bowls with sun spirals, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1999 (top), 2006 (middle), 2007 (bottom). Earthenware. D. 4 1/4", W. 9 3/8", W. 10 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 130
    Figure 130

    Jars with Kolowisi, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2006 (left), 2008 (right). Earthenware. H. 7 1/2", 9 1/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 131
    Figure 131

    Bowl, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2007. Earthenware. D. 10 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 132
    Figure 132

    Jar and bowl, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2011 (left), 2013 (right). Earthenware. H. 8", W. 7 1/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 133
    Figure 133

    Bowl, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2014. Earthenware. W. 10". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 134
    Figure 134

    Jars decorated with motifs drawn from rock art figures, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, (left to right) 2004, 2007, 2011, 2011. Earthenware. H. 6 3/4", 6 7/8", 7", 8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 135
    Figure 135

    Cornmeal bowl decorated with rock art motifs, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2014. Earthenware. W. 12". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 136
    Figure 136

    Cornmeal bowl made for Darrell and Shaun Tsabetsaye, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2012. Earthenware. W. approx. 12". (Photo, Shaun Tsabetsaye.)

  • Figure 137
    Figure 137

    Medicine bowl, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2012. Earthenware. W. 12". (Photo, Shaun Tsabetsaye.)

  • Figure 138
    Figure 138

    Cornmeal bowls, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2012 (top), 2013 (bottom). Earthenware. W. 11 3/8", 8 3/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  •  Figure 139
    Figure 139

    Cornmeal bowl decorated with motifs of Pinnawa Glaze-on-white bowls from 1350–1450, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2013. Earthenware. D. 9 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 140
    Figure 140

    Cornmeal bowl, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2013. Earthenware. W. 8 3/8". (Photo, Edward Chappell.) 

  • Figure 141
    Figure 141

    Cornmeal bowl, Prayers and Messengers, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2015. Earthenware. D. 9 3/4". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 142
    Figure 142

    Jar, Anderson Peynetsa, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1989. Earthenware. H. 5 3/8". (Photo, Edward Chappell.) 

  • Figure 143
    Figure 143

    Jar, Alan E. Lasilou, New Mexico, ca. 2007. Earthenware. H. 5 7/8". (Photo, Edward Chappell.) 

  • Figure 144
    Figure 144

    Jar with painted and decal decoration, Les Namingha, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 2010–2011. Earthenware. H. 5". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth)

  • Figure 145
    Figure 145

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2013. Earthenware. H. 8 3/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 146
    Figure 146

    Duck vessel, Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1998. Earthenware. L. 7 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 147
    Figure 147

    Frog vessel, Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1996. Earthenware. L. 6". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 148
    Figure 148

    Pottery bears, Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1988–1992. Earthenware. L. 2 3/4" (left), 2 3/8" (right). (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 149
    Figure 149

    Canteens, Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1993 (top), 1998 (bottom). Earthenware. H. 7 1/4", 6 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 150
    Figure 150

    Bowl, Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2005. Earthenware. D. 6 1/4". (Photo, Edward Chappell.) 

  • Figure 151
    Figure 151

    Jar, Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2008. Earthenware. D. 7 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 152
    Figure 152

    Jar, Josephine and Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, ca. 1990. Earthenware. D. 4 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 153
    Figure 153

    Cornmeal bowl, Josephine and Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1994. Earthenware. D. 7 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 154
    Figure 154

    Owls, Josephine and Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1998 (left), 2000 (center), 2001 (right). Earthenware. H. 6 1/8", 6 1/2", 6 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 155
    Figure 155

    Cornmeal bowl and incense burner, Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2002 (corn bowl) and 2010 (incense burner). Earthenware. W. 5 7/8", D. 6", respectively. (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 156
    Figure 156

    Milford Nahohai, at Village of the Great Kivas, 2011, who is particularly interested in spirals with pairs of outer scrolls, as seen at upper left. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 157
    Figure 157

    Parrot bowls. Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1995 (top), 2000 (second). Earthenware. D. 5 1/2", 7". Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2004 (third), 2010 (bottom). Earthenware. D. 6 3/8", 6 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 158
    Figure 158

    Kechipawan parrot bowl, Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2012. Earthenware. D. 6 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 159
    Figure 159

    Detail of incense burner with colored frogs illustrated in fig. 155, Milford Nahohai, 2010. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 160
    Figure 160

    Jar, Milford and Jaycee ­Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2013–2014. Earthenware. D. 7 1/2". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 161
    Figure 161

    Cornmeal bowl, Eileen Yatsattie, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, June 1997. Earthenware. W. 5 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 162
    Figure 162

    Eileen Yatsattie with her traditionally made second bowl for Rain Priests. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 163
    Figure 163

    Owls, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 1989. Earthenware. Left: Shaped and painted by Irma Nahohai. H. 6 1/2". Back center: Shaped by Josephine Nahohai and painted by herself and Irma. H. 7 7/8". Right: Shaped by Josephine and painted by Maynard Nahohai. H. 7 3/8". Chicken figure (front center) by Josephine and painted by Maynard, ca. 1990. W. 4 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.) 

  • Figure 164
    Figure 164

    Cornmeal bowls and jars, Josephine Nahohai, painted by Maynard Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, ca. 1990. Earthenware. H. of large jar 6 1/4", W. of small bowl 3 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 165
    Figure 165

    Maynard Nahohai with his painted and sgraffito-decorated greenware stew bowl for Long Horn House, 2008. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 166
    Figure 166

    Jaycee Nahohai with his first large owl, 2012. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 167
    Figure 167

    Small bowls, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2004 (bottom left), 2009 (top), 2010 (bottom right). Earthenware. D. 5 1/4", 5 1/4", 4 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 168
    Figure 168

    Jar, Randy and Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2007. Earthenware. H. 5 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 169
    Figure 169

    Puzzle jar, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2013. Earthenware. H. 7 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 170
    Figure 170

    Pitchers, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2014. Earthenware. D. 8 5/8" (left), 7 5/8" (right). (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 171
    Figure 171

    Kolowisi plate, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2011. Earthenware. D. 10 5/8". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 172
    Figure 172

    Frog jars, Jaycee Nahohai, (right) shaped by Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2012. Earthenware. H. 6", 7 1/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 173
    Figure 173

    Owls, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2009 (left), 2010 (center), 2011 (right). Earthenware. H. 5 1/2", 4 7/8", 5 3/4". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 174
    Figure 174

    Owls, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2013 (left) and 2014 (right). Earthenware. H. 7 1/8", 7 3/4". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 175
    Figure 175

    First large owl to survive, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2013. Earthenware. H. 15 1/2". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 176
    Figure 176

    Jaycee Nahohai shaping a jar lid on a banding wheel, 2015. (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 177
    Figure 177

    Lidded jar, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2014. Earthenware. H. 9 7/8". (Photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 178
    Figure 178

    Storyteller owl, Jaycee Nahohai and Rowena Him, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2014. Earthenware. H. 7". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 179
    Figure 179

    Lidded jar, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2014. Earthenware. D. 12". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 180
    Figure 180

    Lidded jar, shaped by Rowena Him and Jaycee Nahohai, painted by Jaycee Nahohai, 2014. Earthenware. H. 4 3/4". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 181
    Figure 181

    Jar, Randy Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2014. Earthenware. H. 8 1/4". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 182
    Figure 182

    Glaze-painted pottery from surface at Hawikuh. (Photo, Paul Diehl.)

  • Figure 183
    Figure 183

    Glaze-painted jar, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2015. Earthenware. H. 8 3/8". (Photo, Edward Chappell.)

  • Figure 184
    Figure 184

    Offering bowls, Jaycee Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2015. Earthenware. D. 5 1/2". (Photo, Edward Chappell.) The bowl on the left is glaze-painted.

  • Figure 185
    Figure 185

    Cornmeal bowl, Milford Nahohai, Pueblo of Zuni, New Mexico, 2004. Earthenware. W. 6". (Photo, Edward Chappell.) This bowl represents his brief influence from Australia, which he had visited.

  • Figure 186
    Figure 186

    Zuni water jar, 1880–1895, brought by George Coleman from Gallup, New Mexico, to Williamsburg, Virginia. (Courtesy, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation; photo, Willie Graham.)