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Mara Kaktins, Melanie Marquis, Ruth Ann Armitage, and Daniel Fraser
Mary Washington's Mended Ceramics: A Study of Eighteenth-Century Glues

Ceramics in America 2016

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Punch bowl, probably Derby, England, 1765–1772. Creamware. D. 6". (Courtesy, The George Washington Foundation; photo, John Earl.) Decorated with distinctive overglaze enamels, this bowl was recovered from the cellar of the Washington house.

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Punch bowl, probably Derby, England, 1765–1772. Creamware. D. 6 1/4". (Courtesy, Kimberley Overman; photo, Zac Cunningham.)

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Cross section of the base of the bowl illustrated in fig. 1. (Courtesy, The George Washington Foundation; photo, John Earl.) Glue residue is clearly visible on the edges of the break.

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Microscopic view of glue residue on the bowl illustrated in fig. 1. (Courtesy, Dovetail Cultural Resources Group.)

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Close-up of a platter fragment, England, 1765–1772. Creamware. (Courtesy, The George Washington Foundation; photo, Zac Cunningham.)

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Close-up of a teapot lid, England, 1765–1772. Creamware. (Courtesy, The George Washington Foundation; photo, Zac Cunningham.)

  • Figure 7
    Figure 7

    Close-up of plate rim fragment, 1750–1760. White salt-glazed stoneware. (Courtesy, The George Washington Foundation; photo, Zac Cunningham.)

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    Mug, England, ca. 1820. Pearlware. H. 2 3/8". (Courtesy, Laura Galke; photo, Zac Cunningham.) Antique mug mended using historic glue recipe.