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Johanna R. Bernstein, Arthur F. Goldberg, and Jennifer Mass
A ComparativeScientific Study of James Morgan and the Kemple Family Stoneware

Ceramics in America 2016

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Jar, attributed to Morgan pottery, Cheesequake, New Jersey, 1775–1784. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 12 1/4". (Private collection; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Jar, Kemple pottery, Ringoes, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, ca. 1746–1790s. Salt-glazed stoneware. H. 11". (Courtesy, Monmouth County Historical Association, Gift of Mrs. J. Amory Haskell; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Jar fragment, Morgan pottery, Cheesequake, New Jersey, 1775–1784. Salt-glazed stoneware. (Courtesy, Robert J. Sim Collection, MCHA; photo, Gavin Ashworth.) This fragment displays a typical example of Morgan’s cobalt-blue watch-spring motif.

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Jar fragment, Kemple pottery site, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, ca. 1746–1790s. Salt-glazed stoneware. (Courtesy, Robert J. Sim Collection, MCHA; photo, Gavin Ashworth.)

  • Figure 5
    Figure 5

    Bivariate elemental plot comparing Zn/Fe and Y/Fe content for the Morgan and Kemple sherds. 

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Bivariate elemental plot comparing Sr/Fe and Rb/Fe content for the Morgan and Kemple sherds.