Chipstone
Menu

Arthur F. Goldberg
Highlights in the Development of the Rockingham and Yellow Ware Industry in the United States - A Brief Review with Representative Examples

Ceramics in America 2003

Full Article
Contents
  • Figure 1
    Figure 1

    Hound-handle pitcher, Harker, Taylor & Co. East Liverpool, Ohio, 1847–1851. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 9 3/4". (All objects from the Arthur F. Goldberg collection; photos, Gavin Ashworth).

  • Figure 2
    Figure 2

    Detail of the Harker, Taylor & Co. mark on the bottom of the pitcher illustrated in fig. 1.

  • Figure 3
    Figure 3

    Hound-handle pitcher, East Liverpool, Ohio, ca. 1965. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 9 3/4". The upper portion and hound are covered with an off-white glaze. The impressed mark reads: “Reproduction Harker Rockingham/Mfg 1848/U.S.A. 1965.”

  • Figure 4
    Figure 4

    Octagonal paneled pitcher, attributed to Bennett & Brothers, East Liverpool, Ohio, or Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, ca. 1844. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 7 3/8". Powdered flint was added to the Rockingham glaze to produce the streaks of green and blue. A similar pitcher with a different Rockingham glaze is in the collection of the East Liverpool Museum of Ceramics, East Liverpool, Ohio.

  • Figure 5a
    Figure 5a

    “Boar and Stag Hunt” pitcher with hound handle, E. & W. Bennett, Baltimore, Maryland, 1850–1858. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 7 7/8".

  • Figure 5b
    Figure 5b

    “Boar and Stag Hunt” pitcher with hound handle, E. & W. Bennett, Baltimore, Maryland, 1850–1858. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 7 7/8".

  • Figure 6
    Figure 6

    Detail of the mark “E. & W. BENNETT/ CANTON AVENUE/ BALTIMORE, MD”. in large rectangle on the base of the pitcher illustrated in fig. 5. Two of the three stilt marks are visible.

  • Figure 7a
    Figure 7a

    “Gypsy” pitcher, E. & W. Bennett, Baltimore, Maryland, 1850–1858. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 8 5/8". This pitcher has a modified branch handle with very crisp defined details. It is marked “E. & W. BENNETT/CANTON AVENUE/BALTIMORE, Md.” in small rectangle and has three stilt marks in a triangular pattern on the base.

  • Figure 7b
    Figure 7b

    “Gypsy” pitcher, E. & W. Bennett, Baltimore, Maryland, 1850–1858. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 8 5/8". This pitcher has a modified branch handle with very crisp defined details. It is marked “E. & W. BENNETT/CANTON AVENUE/BALTIMORE, Md.” in small rectangle and has three stilt marks in a triangular pattern on the base.

  • Figure 8
    Figure 8

    “Heron” pitcher, attributed to E. & W. Bennett, Baltimore, Maryland, 1850–1858. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 10". This is a molded covered ale pitcher with a branch handle.

  • Figure 9
    Figure 9

    Shaving mug, E. & W. Bennett, Baltimore, Maryland, 1850–1858. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 4 3/8". This molded mug has the image on both sides of Toby seated holding a razor in one hand with a mug in his other. It is marked “E. & W. BENNETT/CANTON AVENUE/BALTIMORE/ Md.” and has three stilt marks in a triangular pattern on the base.

  • Figure 10
    Figure 10

    Teapot, attributed to E. & W. Bennett, Baltimore, Maryland 1851–1857. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 10". This teapot has the molded inscription “REBEKAH AT THE WELL” on the front and a flower finial on the lid. Three spur marks in a triangular pattern are on the base.

  • Figure 11
    Figure 11

    Lion figure, attributed to Lyman, Fenton & Co., or United States Pottery Company, Bennington, Vermont, 1849–1858. Flint enamel earthenware. H. 9 1/2". The lion has a shredded clay mane and a protruding tongue.

  • Figure 12
    Figure 12

    Hound-handled pitcher, United States Pottery Company, Bennington, Vermont, 1852–1856. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 12 1/8". There are three stilt marks in a triangular pattern on the base.

  • Figure 13
    Figure 13

    Hound-handle pitcher, American Pottery Company, Jersey City, New Jersey, 1840–1845. Rockingham glazed stoneware. H. 9 1/4". This molded pitcher has double dipped brown glaze on its upper portion and a putty colored glaze inside. The neck and shoulder have an undulating vine with leaves, tendrils, and grape clusters. A scene of hounds attacking a stag is on one side and a boar being attacked by mastiffs is on the other.

  • Figure 14
    Figure 14

    Detail of the mark on the bottom of the pitcher illustrated in fig. 13.

  • Figure 15
    Figure 15

    Hound-handle pitcher, American Pottery Company, Jersey City, New Jersey, 1840–1850. Rockingham glazed stoneware. H. 8 1/2". This molded pitcher has a reddish brown glaze outside and a putty colored glaze inside. A vine with leaves, tendrils, and grape clusters is on its neck and shoulder.

  • Figure 16
    Figure 16

    Detail of the “AMERICAN POTTERY” mark on the collar band of hound-handle pitcher illustrated in fig. 15.

  • Figure 17
    Figure 17

    Pitcher, attributed to the American Pottery Co., Jersey City, New Jersey, ca. 1845. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 9 1/4". This molded pitcher is decorated with an elaborate design featuring gothic architecture and eight apostles. This example is unmarked although a similar pitcher with the American Pottery Co. mark is in the Clement Collection, Brooklyn Museum of Art. 

  • Figure 18
    Figure 18

    Toby Philpott pitchers. Left: attributed to the Salamander Works, New York City or Woodbridge, New Jersey, 1837–1850s. Rockingham glazed stoneware. H. 13". This example has a reddish brown glaze, double dipped on its upper body, and a putty colored glaze inside. This form probably represents pattern J on the Salamander Works’ 1837 price list. Right: attributed to the American Pottery Company, Jersey City, New Jersey, 1840. Rockingham glazed stoneware. H. 9". This pitcher has a rustic branch handle and a reddish brown, putty colored glaze inside.

  • Figure 19
    Figure 19

    Hound-handle pitcher, attributed to Salamander Works, New York City or Woodbridge, New Jersey, 1837–1850s. Rockingham glazed stoneware. H. 11". A hunt scene of hounds attacking a stag is on one side and a boar being attacked by mastiffs is on the other. The pitcher has a leafy hop vine with flowers around the neck and a scalloped design around the shoulder.

  • Figure 20
    Figure 20

    Hound-handle pitcher, Salamander Works, New York City or Woodbridge, New Jersey, 1837–1850s. Rockingham glazed stoneware. H. 10". A hunt scene of hounds attacking a stag is on one side and a boar being attacked by mastiffs is on the other. The lower half of the pitcher is not glazed, and the interior is putty colored. The neck has a leafy hop vine with flowers, and the shoulder has a square scalloped fringe. The base is embossed “B2.” This pitcher is called the “Hound Pattern” on the Salamander Works’ 1837 price list.

  • Figure 21
    Figure 21

    Pitcher, Salamander Works, New York City or Woodbridge, New Jersey, 1837–1850s. Rockingham glazed stoneware. H. 11 1/2". This example is a reddish brown color with a putty colored glaze inside; an oak leafed branch with acorns is around its neck, a lotus leaf design on its shoulder, and its body surface is covered with elaborate parallel rhomboids surrounded by a delicate dot-like design simulating a pineapple. It has a branch handle and is embossed N1 on the base.

  • Figure 22
    Figure 22

    Covered pitcher, Swan Hill Pottery, Edward Hanks and Charles Fish, South Amboy, New Jersey, 1850–1852. Yellow ware. H. 11 7/8". This example has a strainer spout and an elaborate bifid branch handle with a branch finial on the lid.

  • Figure 23
    Figure 23

    Detail of the mark on the base of the yellow ware pitcher illustrated in fig. 22. It is impressed “SWAN HILL/POTTERY/SOUTH AMBOY.”

  • Figure 24
    Figure 24

    Hound-handle pitcher, possibly East Liverpool, Ohio, mid-nineteenth century. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 9 3/4". This eight sided pitcher has a molded eagle beneath its spout and is colored with a speckled blue flint glaze.

  • Figure 25
    Figure 25

    Pitcher, American, mid-nineteenth century. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 10". This molded pitcher has a hanging game scene and a branch shaped handle. Three stilt marks in a triangular pattern are on the base.

  • Figure 26
    Figure 26

    Presentation pitcher, attributed to John L. Rue and Company, 1870. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 9". The pitcher has a branch-shaped handle and a flint enamel glazed frog inside on the bottom. The name “D. REGAN” in raised white glazed letters is on the front with “Daniel Regan” and “August 3, 1870” incised on the base.

  • Figure 27
    Figure 27

    Presentation pitcher, probably South Amboy, New Jersey, 1860–1870. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 10". This pitcher may have been made by John L. Rue and Company, the Swan Hill Pottery, or a later firm copying their work. It has an elaborate filigree-like design around a circular medallion with a bearded man’s head. On the front, in white letters, is the name “MRS JOHN WEBB.” The inside has a white glaze and a molded Rockingham glazed frog on the bottom.

  • Figure 28
    Figure 28

    Teapot, attributed to John E. Jeffords and Company, Philadelphia, 1868–ca. 1876 and possibly later. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 9 3/4". A medallion of a woman’s head is on both sides.

  • Figure 29
    Figure 29

    Pitcher attributed to John E. Jeffords and Company, Philadelphia, 1868–ca. 1876 and possibly later. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 8". A medallion of a woman’s head is on both sides.

  • Figure 30
    Figure 30

    Pitcher, American, mid- nineteenth century. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 11 1/8".

  • Figure 31
    Figure 31

    Cake mold, American, mid- nineteenth century. Rockingham glazed earthenware. D. 10".

  • Figure 32
    Figure 32

    Spittoon, Harker, Taylor & Company, East Liverpool, Ohio, ca. 1852. Rockingham glazed earthenware. D. 8 1/2". Impressed mark on base: “ETRURIA WORKS/EAST LIVERPOOL” in circle with “1852” in center.

  • Figure 33
    Figure 33

    Candlestick, Lyman, Fenton & Co. / United States Pottery Company, Bennington, Vermont, 1849–1858. Rockingham glazed earthenware. H. 9 3/8". Flint enamel was added to the glaze.

  • Figure 34
    Figure 34

    Figures probably by W. H. Farrar, Geddes (Syracuse), New York, ca. 1840–1857, or made in Lyons, New York, by Nathan Clark or Thompson Harrington in the 1850s. Rockingham glazed molded earthenware H. 9 7/8" and 10 1/4". These unmarked figures have a quarter inch central hole in the base.